Tackle Your Hybrid Network Complexity in 2020

On-Demand

Video Transcription

Laura?:
Yeah, Chris, that’s correct. Yep. The assessment hasn’t gone out yet. We’re still working on finalizing it.

Chris:
Okay. So, this was kind enough to put me back at the beginning of the presentation.

Tim:
I saw that.

Chris:
I will get us back. But what I’d like to do during these calls, and you guys can let me know if you feel this is the right approach, is to actually go through a sampling of the questions and have people score themselves during the webinar itself. The only thing is that it does take time to do that, but if I don’t do that, they won’t be able to move on to the next section, which is, “Okay, here’s what you’ve been scored and here’s the result.” I apologize for having to flip through these slides really quick, but I’m trying to get back to where I was.

Chris:
What I tell people typically is, “We’d like you to kind of rate yourself on a one to five scale based on how much you agree or disagree on a given statement.” And we ask these questions, “Do you agree or disagree?” Similar to how the interactive assessment actually works. Now, I’ve done this a couple different ways. If I’m standing in front of a room, sometimes I just put this up on the sides and tell people, “Grab a napkin and a pen and write down. If you feel like you highly agree with this, give yourself a five, if you don’t, give yourself a one.”

Chris:
But I’ve also done it where we’ve used this tool itself, BrightTALK, to do the votes for each of these and get an assessment for everybody at once, so we get a feel for what the room level is at. That does require set up ahead of time because you would need to convert these statements into votes. But I was curious what direction you guys want to go. If you want to make a truly interactive, if you wanted to have people just simply kind of look through these statements and score themselves, or did you not want to, perhaps, do the section at all and go simply to your section without doing the assessments, because they will be doing the interactive assessment eventually.

Laura?:
From my perspective… I mean, Tim, go ahead. You’re going to be the follow-up.

Tim:
I see the value in it, Chris, first off, I’d say I definitely see the value in it and I think it gets people. What I like about it is it gets them to think rather than them just kind of listening to either one of us kind of drone on, and it engages them a little more and it draws them in, because now they have to actually kind of apply what you’ve been talking about and think about it in the context of their own environment. So, I like that because it makes it a lot more interactive, and I think they take away something with that. So, it really just comes down to how much time, how quick of a pace do you think you can go through it without sacrificing the intent of what we’re trying to achieve?

Chris:
Yeah. I would say whenever you do it interactively, it always takes a little bit longer. I’ve timed this out myself that this entire presentation with all the slides included, would, for me, take about 25 minutes, maybe even 30 minutes to complete, that’s not including FireMon’s content, right? And I want to make sure that we include plenty of time for FireMon’s content, in addition to if we want to have time for Q&A at the end. So, I would think that if we didn’t go with an interactive approach, if we didn’t have the votes, we simply had the statements and had people keeping track of score on their own or simply kind of thinking in their head, “Well, where do I stand on this? I have integrated my islands of automation, I haven’t. Where do I stand?”

Chris:
Because ultimately, what I’d like to end up with at the end of the deck is, okay, if you’re at these particular levels, what can you do? What can you start to do as a pragmatic approach to addressing it? What practical things can you start moving forward on? And in order to give them that advice, they really need to have an idea of where they stand.

Tim:
Okay.

Elisa:
And then the other thing too is, and I can say, “Hey,” because we’ll hopefully have the link to the actual assessment as part of the attachment in the webinar, say, “Hey, if you want to take it again, there’s going to be a link here where you can take it and you’ll actually get a PDF of your results.”

Chris:
Yeah. And what I would actually push for is that, what I’m presenting here is a fragment of the overall assessment. It’s only one-third of it, really, because there’s six questions, where there’s, I think, 18 in the actual interactive assessment. So, this is almost like a sample assessment for folks.

Tim:
Yeah. I was going to say, this would be a way to encourage those listeners and those that are participating in the webinar to go ahead and engage in the assessment also, so it’s kind of a way for us to push that.

Chris:
Yeah, absolutely. I would still want to include these last couple slides to give people an idea what level they’re at, because some people may end up not doing the full interactive one, and they probably want to feel like they got something out of doing the smaller interactive one during this presentation. But I can certainly go through this very quickly. I’m not going to be reading off these slides. And my portion, like I said, the entire deck as it stands now is probably about 25 to 30 minutes.

Tim:
Okay. Well, I can say on my side, I can adjust. I have about 20 content slides, I’ll say, maybe 19 content slides, but there’s a couple of them that I could eliminate very quickly, probably three or four of them, I could eliminate pretty quickly, and then I can pace myself, based on the time, and still leaves us… So, Laura, I’m not concerned if Chris goes over a little bit. I think this is of value as well and I wouldn’t want to shortchange that, especially as it relates to the survey or bringing people into the survey. So, it’s really up to you how you want to time slice it, but I mean, I can adjust pretty easily, I’m pretty light on my feet from that respect.

Chris:
Yeah. However you guys would like to do it. I mean, normally what ends up happening is it ends up being a roughly even amount of time between Forrester side and what the vendor speaks to, but I’ve had times where I speak longer, especially when it’s thought leadership around these types of topics versus going over data results from a survey, things like that.

Chris:
And that would basically be my portion of it, then I would hand off to you folks and you guys would show your content. So, before I remove slides… Go ahead.

Laura?:
Oh, I was just going to say if Tim or Elisa had any comments or questions before we… if Tim wanted to show his slides next or not or fine tune them a little first, or whatever you’d like to do, Tim.

Tim:
Yeah, I’m just looking at mine. I need to slim them down. I mean, we can show them. I don’t have a problem showing them at all, but let’s see here. I mean, do I just remove his, yes, remove my slides, and then I upload.

Laura?:
Oh, Chris, do you have any seed questions or commonly asked questions that you think we should have prepared?

Chris:
I will give you some. Yeah, I will get you some.

Laura?:
Okay, perfect.

Chris:
And typically, what I’d like to have is a couple questions that either I or you guys can answer, product questions, perhaps, in addition to automation strike team questions, that sort of thing.

Laura?:
Okay, perfect.

Tim:
So, my deck basically, Chris, it starts at, actually, some of the same stuff that we talked about during our session that you participated in toward the end of last year, but it talks about the technology landscape, it talks about some of the problem landscape as well, why we are in the predicament that we are today, especially as it relates to the number of misconfigurations that are taking place and human error things that we see almost on a daily basis now, data being exposed, people not even hacking, that they’re just making misconfiguration mistakes and exposing on data unnecessarily. Hackers are just drive by and they’re just scanning. They’re using their own type of automation in order to find that accessible data that’s out there in the public domain. So, it really just talks about that. And then some of the costliest threats as far as when you make a change, and that change actually causes an impact, even though it’s an approved change, and just the whole complexity gap. Let’s see, did that. Oh, no, that’s something else. Did it upload here? My screen blanked out on me.

Chris:
It says it’s processing.

Tim:
All right. There we go. It just blanked. That was why.

Tim:
All right, here we go.

Chris:
Do we have an idea of the number of registrants so far?

Laura?:
We haven’t actually started the promotions yet. They start next week. We have three emails going out, and that’s usually where we get the registrants. We do have, I think, two people that heard about it, so those have signed up so far, and then we’ve got like six FireMon people as well. But that’s when we’ll start getting them.

Chris:
Yeah, I apologize for jumping the gun on that. When you do get them out, we’ve probably talked about, if you tweet about it or put a LinkedIn post, let me know and I could share it.

Laura?:
Awesome. We definitely will do that. Thank you.

Tim:
So, like yourself, Chris, this slide here is busy on purpose, just the fact that it’s not a lack of technology that we have, so I mean, it’s supposed to be an eye chart, so not meant for anybody to try to read anything on there than the amount of technology that’s out there in front of us today, and the fact that I feel sorry for the people that are trying to evaluate the technology that they’re adding into their environment and get it right without having buyer’s remorse after the fact. So, it’s no wonder.

Tim:
And then if you connect that along with… And this was our previous state of hybrid cloud security and the fact that the business is moving faster than we have the ability to secure it in a consistent manner. So, it’s no wonder that we have the problems that we have. They are taking advantage of it for the right reasons, but if you look at the shortage, it’s real. Even though it may not be as tangible as we’d like for it to be and quantifiable as we’d like for it to be, the cybersecurity skills shortage is definitely having an impact and we’re seeing that around the industry. All it takes is one quick Google search or one quick brief in your newsfeed to see what’s going on on a day in day out basis. It seems like lately here, it’s every single day we see something new popping up.

Tim:
So, this is one, I could take both of these out, approved change, causing an impact. I’d like this slide here. I take a little bit of time to talk about it only because I think it puts so many different things into perspective whenever you think about it from an environmental perspective. This could be rise in number of rules in an environment and the inability of the people to respond to that increase in just the sheer volume of rules that they’re trying to manage as it relates to their security policies, but it could also relate to just the number of application services, resources and assets that are being deployed too that they really don’t have their arms around it. It’s either not being tracked diligently, it’s not being managed diligently. I mean, whenever you hear security people say that they have things in their infrastructure that they don’t even know about, it begs the question, how can you secure something that you don’t know about? How can you protect something that you don’t even know exists? But yet we’re hearing that on a day in day out basis.

Tim:
So, as they continue in their cloud first strategies and adopting their digital transformation efforts, we’re just seeing these highly challenged areas continue to accelerate up into the right, unlike my stock portfolio.

Tim:
Lot of benefits to automation. I think we could pull any of these out and talk about the benefits of automation, especially in the area. This kind of could tail off at some of the things that you talked about earlier to, given the different areas. I chose to just talk about, I think, the most important one, and that’s at the end of the day, we’re trying to reduce risk or we’re trying to mitigate risk to a level that’s acceptable by the business, and today, we’re kind of missing the mark on that. Kind of talk about that. This graphic will go away. This little cartoon is nothing more than the same thing as this graph here, just showing some of the high, more extreme areas of risk, and what we have to do to mitigate.

Tim:
And it’s not just us saying this, I mean, this is folks like our partner, Gartner, saying this stuff, but it’s also our customers saying things directly where they’re seeing the impact as far as the shortages, the need for aggregating the number of total solutions that they have in their platform. They’re not able to quantify the value that they’re getting out of the number of the platforms that they have. A lot of the CISOs, not only are they trying to reduce costs and save money, but they’re trying to get their people to help them quantify the value. What is the return on the security investments that our company is making in the tools that you’re proclaiming that you’re using? And what we’re finding is that a lot of the people, they’re struggling to actually bring that back to the CISOs at the CIO level and tell them, how do you quantify the return on this investment?

Tim:
Obviously, we’re trying to sort through the numbers of event saturation, alarm saturation and trying to get down to those things that really matter, especially whenever you’re already limited on resources and the people that you need to examine these things. And of course, cloud and compliance is always at the forefront.

Tim:
Then we talk about the trigger for change. I know we went through this in our meeting. We talked about whether it’s either process driven or debt driven. This one I could eliminate. What I was trying to represent here is, this is what’s not working today. This is our traditional kind of workflow process methodology that’s kind of been tried and true, especially in the IT security realm. And while we have achieved some success in accelerating components of this, it’s still not getting us where we need to be today because the business is still outpacing our ability to secure it and to honor the requests of the business at a rate probably 5X, 6X, maybe 8X, what it was, say, three or four years ago. So, this isn’t working. So, if it’s not working and you’re not adding people, then what do you do?

Tim:
This whole chart, I think we talked about this one too. So, it just shows, the events on the left, these are opportunities to automate, areas of automation. I think this would kind of tie nicely into some of the things that you talked about too. And so you can either go along the traditional path, kind of like that chart represented here and there’s areas for advancement in that area, or we can look for a way to fast pass some of these things, or what I like to talk about is identifying the low hanging fruit. And it’s not boiling the ocean.

Tim:
When we talk about a multi-level automation strategy, we’re talking about where am I going to get the biggest bang for my buck out of my automation efforts? And there’s different areas where we can automate that’s going to give us a greater return, and there’s going to be some areas that may require a higher level of effort, but also I think we need to look at the maturation of the organization to determine where can you consume the automation and then how are you going to put the watermarks in place to know that you’re doing what it is that you need to do and quantify that along the way as well?

Tim:
This one I will eliminate because it gets a little bit more into our technology, and like you, I hate the build outs. I will not have any build outs in my slides so it doesn’t slow us down. And rather than doing this one, customer use cases, I think I’ll just talk about some real world examples of what we’ve seen, and I’ll hit on one of these. I’m not going to go into one of these, if time permits. But this is an area where I can go past it also. If for some reason we’re running short on time and we want to leave some additional time at the end for questions, then this is something that I could fast forward through.

Tim:
I’d like to keep this one in but I defer to you on this one, Chris. This is something I think we talked about in our meeting too, because I asked you the question, I think it was you that I asked the question, “Are you seeing more people talk about the availability of API’s as it relates to some of their automation strategies and how they leverage some of the technology that they have, and how did they combine synergies between the technologies that they have if the API’s from the vendors are lacking, and are you getting more inbound questions about that and stuff like that?” And obviously, we have a very strong API, otherwise, we wouldn’t put this out here if we didn’t have a large confidence in the strength of our API and the commitment that we have to a robust API structure.

Chris:
I would definitely include this, because one of the things I’m going to mention when I show that slide that shows multiple graphics at the same time on that equalizer, I’m going to say that to address the discrepancies between these tools, you need to have proper integration through open API’s. So, this feeds directly into what you guys are going to present here.

Tim:
And that’s actually a Forrester quote that I use there, so I will change that.

Chris:
I’m sure Chase will be happy. That’s Chase Cunningham.

Tim:
So, this gets a little too techie, I think, for the purpose of this webinar, so I’m not going to go into the actual FireMon solution. So, this will be one that gets scaled down, and there will not be an automation built out here.

Tim:
I mean, Laura, that’s up to you, or Elisa, what you think as far as if we have time to talk about. I know we don’t want to talk about the piece parts. Do you think there’s value to talk about the architecture that we provide? I didn’t know how FireMon’s product-wise that you wanted to hit or if you just want to leave it more agnostic to the area of concern.

Elisa:
Oh, sorry, Laura.

Laura?:
No, you go ahead. I was just going to ask what your opinion was, because I don’t have one.

Elisa:
I’d probably do the next slide versus this one because it’s going to be changing.

Tim:
Okay. All right. So, just going to the, hey, just a quick look at our portfolio. And I can talk to this very quickly without going into great detail, and then that’s the end of it. So, like I said, I can go through those with whatever time we have left and still leave… You just tell me how much time you want left at the end, whether you want five minutes or 10 minutes to questions and I’ll make sure I hit that mark.

Laura?:
I think about 10 minutes for questions is good, because we’ve got a whole bunch of seed ones on our side, and we don’t have to ask them, and then Chris is going to send over his. I mean, I feel like we’re going to get a fair amount of questions from the audience. I don’t know, Chris, when you’ve done this one before, do you usually get a few questions?

Chris:
I’ve seen all variants. I’ve seen where we have too many questions to answer, and I’ve seen situations where we have to dive right into the seed questions. So, regardless, we’ll have seed questions ready to go, which will keep our faces covered.

Laura?:
Good. Okay. I think that looks good. Elisa, do you have any questions from an emcee perspective? I mean, I’ll build in the introduction slide with both of the photos. I mean, usually, it’s best probably to have each presenter introduce themselves before they start chatting, or Christ and Tim, would you prefer for Elisa to give your bios?

Chris:
I’m fine introducing myself.

Laura?:
Okay.

Tim:
Yeah, either way, I’m good.

Elisa:
So, you want me to… like I’d start out saying, “Hi, my name is Elisa,” I introduce myself. I was going to say, “I’m joined by Tim and Chris,” flesh that out, “and today we’ll be discussing blah, blah, blah.” I was just going to quickly mention your names and name of the webinar, do the little bit of housekeeping and then turn it over to you, Chris.

Chris:
Yep, that sounds good. Yeah. I mean, when I start, I’ll basically just say that I’m a principal analyst, I sell the automation, and get right into the content.

Elisa:
Okay. And then, Tim, when you’re done with your side, it’ll go back to me, I’ll just say, “Let’s go ahead and check for any questions.” And then below we’ll do the Q&A, so I’ll call them out. If there any ones that you send, Chris, that you want me to specifically call out just let me know.

Chris:
Yeah, I’ll let you know.

Elisa:
And then I’ll finish it out. “That’s all the time we have. Thanks for joining us, blah, blah, blah. Bye.”

Chris:
Bye. No, that’s Facetime.

Laura?:
And then, Chris, between your presentation and Tim, do you just want to say, “Okay, I’m turning it over to Tim for brief session.”

Chris:
Yeah.

Laura?:
Perfect.

Chris:
Yep, turn it right over.

Elisa:
And so we do want to do the assessment with the audience, correct?

Chris:
Yeah. I mean, it sounds like it would work out. Yeah. Certainly, it’s not something that I would go through solely, I’d go through it at a pretty quick clip, but somewhere in that we should have perhaps that link to… Is this the link to the assessment itself, firemon.com/automation?

Laura?:
No.

Elisa:
No.

Tim:
This is just a call to action screen. We can make that anything we want. I’ll leave that to Laura and Elisa.

Elisa:
And we can have the link in the attachments section of the webinar.
Chris:
Perfect. Yeah. That’s how I would approach it, is when we do the assessment, I’ll say, “This is a miniature assessment. The full assessment you can find through the attachment or attachment link section. But let’s get started and we’ll do a quick one right now.”

Elisa:
Laura, there’s a way to do it in the form of a poll, correct?

Laura?:
Yeah. I haven’t actually done it before, but I can explore that because I think that’d be kind of interesting. I don’t know. Have you done it as a live poll before, Chris, or is it more of a self-assessment?

Chris:
No, we definitely have. And it’s useful to kind of get a feel for the room itself, because when I go to the section, a couple slides about if you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, I can tell what the majority of folks in the room are. But if you do an interactive, it definitely slows the pace down because you have to turn the poll on, have people vote, get the results, turn the poll off, turn the poll on. I’ve done it either way, and both ways work, but I’m just saying from a timing standpoint, we might want to just have it be verbal versus an actual poll.

Laura?:
Okay.

Elisa:
Okay, yeah, that sounds good.

Chris:
And really, I mean, you want people to go to the full interactive assessment regardless. So, ultimately, the goal should not necessarily be to get really great answers on the webinar, but to get them to be like, “Oh, these questions are valuable. I want to take a deeper poll or go in that direction.”

Tim:
Exactly. Yeah, that’s what I was thinking. Exactly right.

Laura?:
Okay, great. Is there anything else you want to chat about? Otherwise, once the invitations start going out, Chris, I’ll let you know. Chris and Tim, if you just want to send me updated slide decks, when you have them on, and then I’ll combine them into one. Obviously, we still have a little bit of time. And then I’ll keep everyone posted in terms of number of registrants. When we get closer to the event, I’ll send over the registrant list.

Chris:
Great. That’s perfect and I’m looking forward to it.

Laura?:
Okay. I think we’re good. Thank you all for your time, and happy Monday, and hopefully you’re having a good 2020 already.

Chris:
Absolutely.

Speaker 5:
Hey, Laura, let me ask you a quick question before you hang up. Thanks, guys.

Chris:
You too.

Speaker 5:
Laura, do you have Chris’s bio or do I need to send that to you?

Laura?:
I do have his bio. I had gotten it previously. Yep, so we have that.

Speaker 5:
Okay, so you’re all set for the introduction?

Laura?:
Yes, I got the bio and headshot.

Speaker 5:
Okay, great. Well, let me know if you need anything in the meantime. Okay?

Laura?:
Okay, awesome. Well, thank you for all your help. I appreciate it.

Speaker 5:
Perfect. Thank you.

Laura?:
Okay, bye. Bye, everybody.

Elisa:
Bye-bye.

Speaker 5:
Bye-bye, everybody.

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