As the “Chief Customer Officer”, I have the chance to travel the world and meet with current and prospective customers to understand how we can provide them value with our solutions.    Unfortunately, with all of this travel, I seem to find myself affected by some pretty crazy events.
A few months back, Dallas got a record 15+ inches of snow in one day, delaying my return trip home for 3 days.   And this week, I find myself in London as part of “The Story”.   Part of the story meaning – I am one of the millions of passengers that cannot get to where I need to go because of an erupting volcano in Iceland.
Mother nature is not happy, or at least it seems that way.   I have learned more about volcanoes in the last week than I ever thought I would know.   For example, I had no idea that ash can get sucked into jet engines, melt and turn into glass, and shut the engines down.   This in turn shuts down 30% of the world’s daily air travel.  What?
The impact of this event is astounding.   The news is reporting on families that are separated (me included), kids missing school, people missing their friend’s weddings, and weddings being held over SKYPE VIDEO!   Fruits, vegetables, pharmaceuticals, and bone marrow for surgeries are not making it into London or other places around the world.  The airlines probably have a lot of continuity plans for “things” so they can keep their planes in the sky but they missed a big one……her – mother nature – in the form of a volcano.
Being one of those affected, this event has my full attention.  It also has me thinking about continuity in general.  More than 9 years ago, FireMon was released to address one critical aspect of Business Continuity; network outages caused by change.  And even today, with all the cool analysis and optimization features available in FireMon, preventing network outage is still a primary driver for most FireMon installations.  Sure, there are other drivers like policy clean-up or compliance, but preventing changes that result in a network outage is still at the top of the list.  Sometimes I overlook the importance of this core capability of FireMon, but this week has reminded me of the importance of continuity.  And in the case of network outages caused by incorrect changes, there is a solution: FireMon.
Now, if only FireMon could better manage volcanos!

As the “Chief Customer Officer”, I have the chance to travel the world and meet with current and prospective customers to understand how we can provide them value with our solutions.    Unfortunately, with all of this travel, I seem to find myself affected by some pretty crazy events.

A few months back, Dallas got a record 15+ inches of snow in one day, delaying my return trip home for 3 days.   And this week, I find myself in London as part of “The Story”.   Part of the story meaning – I am one of the millions of passengers that cannot get to where I need to go because of an erupting volcano in Iceland.  

Mother nature is not happy, or at least it seems that way.   I have learned more about volcanoes in the last week than I ever thought I would know.   For example, I had no idea that ash can get sucked into jet engines, melt and turn into glass, and shut the engines down.   This in turn shuts down 30% of the world’s daily air travel.  What?

The impact of this event is astounding.   The news is reporting on families that are separated (me included), kids missing school, people missing their friend’s weddings, and weddings being held over SKYPE VIDEO!   Fruits, vegetables, pharmaceuticals, and bone marrow for surgeries are not making it into London or other places around the world.  The airlines probably have a lot of continuity plans for “things” so they can keep their planes in the sky but they missed a big one……her – mother nature – in the form of a volcano.

Being one of those affected, this event has my full attention.  It also has me thinking about continuity in general.  More than 9 years ago, FireMon was released to address one critical aspect of Business Continuity; network outages caused by change.  And even today, with all the cool analysis and optimization features available in FireMon, preventing network outage is still a primary driver for most FireMon installations.  Sure, there are other drivers like policy clean-up or compliance, but preventing changes that result in a network outage is still at the top of the list.  Sometimes I overlook the importance of this core capability of FireMon, but this week has reminded me of the importance of continuity.  And in the case of network outages caused by incorrect changes, there is a solution: FireMon.

Now, if only FireMon could better manage volcanoes!