I’ve been attending the Black Hat Security Conference in Las Vegas for almost a solid decade now, and if there’s one thing that’s for sure, it’s that the conference continues to evolve.

Given, when I first started attending Black Hat those many years ago, it was not as a marketing rep for a security software vendor, but as a reporter attempting to get my head around the emerging threat/exploit landscape.


However, even if my time is no longer spent attending sessions, and trying (with varying degrees of success) to understand what is being presented, a walk across this year’s show floor clearly evidences the continued shift towards a more business-centric audience.

This is nothing new, of course, as hardcore Black Hat attendees have been decrying the show’s evolution into more of an “RSA in the desert” for years. However, it’s clear that with each passing summer this change becomes ever more the reality.

When I was working for pen testing specialists Core Security in 2008, it was clear that ethical hackers, primarily researchers, still made up a huge swath of the Black Hat audience; this no longer would appear to be the case.

Certainly it has a lot to do with spending more time in the vendor exhibition space, but with each year I see more corporations and government agencies listed on attendees’ badges, and fewer humorous attempts to dodge identification (though we do have several “ninjas” and at least one “director of rainbows and unicorns” listed among our 2014 badge scans).

As I was discussing this phenomenon with longtime industry guru Alan Shimel (currently of the CISO Group and Security Bloggers Network) we were debating the potential upsides and downsides.

First off, neither of us would debate that there’s still a wealth of extremely valuable research on the Black Hat schedule, and I can’t even make the claim in recent years of attending many of these sessions.

Another key component to consider is that there are the sister DEF CON and parallel B-Sides Las Vegas shows, which cater directly and almost exclusively to ethical hackers and focusing almost solely on research, allowing Black Hat to grow more… corporate.

You also have the phenomenon of people who started out as Black Hat researchers who are now focused more on the business side of things, having built vital companies out of the expertise they used to share as conference presenters (the guys from White Hat Security are a fitting and high-profile example).

As noted above, one of the other significant changes in Black Hat attendance is the ever-increasing number of government attendees. In years past there may have been a lot of Red Team/Blue Team types – and likely still are – but today, there’s an overwhelming number of state and federal security officials in attendance – with their names and titles displayed openly on their badges (another notable shift).

My impression is that many of the people who first came to Black Hat – and now may spend more time at Def Con or B-Sides – may disparage the show’s change in interests, arguing that the event is now too focused on the business side.

However, for companies like FireMon this shift has obviously made the event even more valuable, providing us with another fantastic opportunity to connect with existing customers and new prospects to tell them more about what our solutions can do.

Is the change good? Is it bad? That’s for each individual to decide on their own, but as Alan and I eventually agreed, it’s really just a natural evolution as hacking and ethical research continue to mature and become an even bigger element of enterprise security.

No matter how you slice it, Black Hat continues to serve as an ideal venue for numerous elements of the security community to connect. No matter what changes come it’s always a pleasure to be there.